Welcome to AOTG.com

Sign up free

Be a part of a unique online community that connects post production professionals and film academics worldwide.

You'll have access to personalize your news feed, access to Live Post Talks and much more. Contribute to the community by posting interesting post production content.

Member Login

Social Login!

Not a Member? Sign Up!

(minimum 3 characters)
I agree with the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
To receive account info and prevent it landing in your spam folder, add info@aotg.com as an email contact.

  • Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations

    Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations

    February 10, 2010, 8:33 am
    Really, any play written for theatre is extremely hard to translate to film and make it filmic. This is especially true for particularly wordy plays, such as anything written by Shakespeare. The number one rule "show not tell" has to be creatively re-thought to make it work in order to translate to screen, and to do that is more easily said than done.



    Criteria:
    -Original text must be (mostly) kept in tact
    -Editing brings something unique/new/particularly "film" to the play
    -Usual rules of montage, continuity, etc.
    Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations
    5. As You Like It (2006)

    At first this film makes the viewer go "eh?" (and not just Canadians...). The cast is multicultural and it takes place in Japan, adding a Japanese cultural twist to the play. Consequently the movie is beautiful to look at and easy to watch, as well as well acted and cut. I especially liked the sumo wrestling scene, because it had a particularly well thought out montage: tense, interesting, and overall cool.
    Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations
    4. Romeo + Juliet (1996)

    This is the epitome of modernizing Shakespeare, and the editing has a lot to do with how they managed to pull it off. It intercuts guerrilla-style news clips, making it clear to the viewer that the city of Verona is inadvertently intertwined in the conflict between two families (companies?). When a Capulet sneezes, it’s more newsworthy than a war overseas. The overall editing style is fast-paced, choppy, and has no problems using cheesy transitions such as box wipes. It’s effective in making the movie very stylized and interesting to watch, but ultimately it hits the viewer over the head and actually gets a bit tiring. That said, it takes the play to a completely different level than Shakespeare could’ve imagined. Makes me wonder what he’d think about it...
    Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations
    3. Richard III (1995)

    This film’s editing is so well thought out that it sucks you into the story, and makes it easy to understand, follow, and watch. It has an almost "call and answer" style of editing, where one angle is perfectly followed up by an opposite angle, and conceptually it makes sense in the viewer’s head. Bonus points for Sir Ian breaking the 3rd wall and making his monologues have more of an audience interaction than the typical talking to oneself. This helps it stay true to the original point of a monologue in a play rather than just representing the monologue on film.
    Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations
    2. Hamlet (1996)

    When I started watching the film, my notes consisted of "too rushed" and "weird montage/cut— my eye is going all over the place." It seemed as if the editing was trying too hard to be purely illustrative and showcase the acting more than tell the story, but I found myself ensconced and thinking "wow I could learn something from this edit" about 15 minutes in. Suddenly my notes took a different turn and I realized what an interesting way to tell Hamlet this is. Brian Blessed is terrifying the first time Hamlet meets his ghost, and this is largely in part due to the heavy cutting and particular way in which the montage was pieced together leading up to his reveal. It was at that point that I realized that I could forgive the "too rushed" feel that I originally had— aside from the fact that the epic film is 4 hours long, even rushed.
    Top 5 Edited Shakespeare Film Adaptations
    1. Titus (1999)

    I still don’t totally get the kid throughout the film, but I do understand that the montage was so beautiful to watch that it was hypnotic. It was hard to pull away and take notes. Every movement makes sense and leads to the next movement as if it was supposed to be there. On top of that, it could jump from ancient to modern art direction and still carry the story. It’s obvious what drives this film— the edit and the art direction take precedence over the text, and makes it a successful film adaptation.

    • Report
    • Share
    • Save

    Share this posting

  • Other Postings By Member
    • Top 5 Edited Andrei Tarkovsky Films
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Andrei Tarkovsky Films

      May 19, 2010, 12:25 pm
      After the last blog entry with the book list, I found myself inspired to revisit Tarkovsky’s body of work. If you’ve read it, you’ll know that he was a stickler for long takes and very little cutting; each cut has a specific purpose and is used more for bringing the viewer into the next part of the story and the rhythm of the story rather than the cut itself or for montage. So, we’ve seen long takes with the emphasis on performance (i.e. Keitel), and now let me wrap up with long takes with the emphasis on story rhythm.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Books Every Editor Should Read About Editing
      EDITING

      Top 5 Books Every Editor Should Read About Editing

      May 6, 2010, 12:16 pm
      The number one thing that I get asked by my readers is "do you have any suggestions for newbie editors?" Well, yes I have many, but my most important suggestion is to read up on your theory. In my relatively short experience in the professional industry I’ve encountered many students and other indie filmmakers who know how to use the tools, but can’t figure out why their films don’t compete well with the same types of films out there using the same tools. I’ve found that most of what those generic film schools/polytechnics lack is a solid theory foundation in its curriculum. It’s one thing to know the tools (Final Cut, Avid, etc); anyone can learn to use the blade tool to cut a scene. But it’s a whole other (much more important) thing to know what to do with them. What will help to make you stand out among the thousands of other "editors" who just bought/downloaded software and learned how to use it? Knowing why you make the cuts you make.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Harvey Keitel’s Editing Method
      EDITING

      Harvey Keitel’s Editing Method

      April 21, 2010, 10:58 am
      Just as there are many different forms of editing, there are also many different forms of acting. Along the same lines, certain forms of editing compliment certain kinds of acting. Harvey Keitel is a good example of someone who uses a particular form of acting (Method Acting, to be exact) where an editing style involving long takes is the most effective way to cut. He immerses himself in his character in order to actually become that character for a long period of time. Likewise, the editing has to allow the viewer to immerse his or herself into the character as well.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Edited Jesus Crucifixion Scenes
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Jesus Crucifixion Scenes

      April 7, 2010, 10:48 am
      Easter 2010 has come and gone. Christians all over the world spent last weekend celebrating Jesus dying on the cross and coming back three days later by hunting for Easter eggs (and hopefully not forgetting to go to church in the meantime). But Christian or not, movies about Jesus appeal to many, and regardless of whether you believe in him as a man or the son of God (or even if you don’t believe he existed at all) his story is still a great story to adapt to film.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Edited Chuck Norris Ass Kicking Scenes
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Chuck Norris Ass Kicking Scenes

      March 24, 2010, 10:16 am
      Periodically my husband and I find things pinned to our door by our nieces who live down the hall from us. The objects they pin up range in content from holiday decorations to 10 year old marker drawings, but some of my favourite are from what appears to be a Chuck Norris day to day tear off calendar with meditative Chuck Norris thoughts or concepts. Some of them have migrated to our fridge for the permanent collection. My personal favourite: "Before Chuck Norris was born, there were no rainbows."

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Scenes Involving the Golden Gate Bridge
      EDITING

      Top 5 Scenes Involving the Golden Gate Bridge

      March 10, 2010, 10:08 am
      I grew up in San Francisco, and I still consider it my true home. Whenever I see a movie that features the city I feel my heart well up and a wave of longing hits me. Thankfully, most of my family is still there and I can go visit them when I have some extra funds. Now I live in Vancouver, which is basically the San Francisco of Canada, and it is very similar— but when I see that Golden Gate I know I’m not home unless I’m there.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Edited Zombie Feeding Frenzy Scenes
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Zombie Feeding Frenzy Scenes

      February 24, 2010, 8:40 am
      George A. Romero is the man responsible for truly putting a philosophical twist on the motivations behind the "Zombie" by asking the question: just <em>why</em> are they eating people? As everyone [now] knows, they don’t process nutrients or really need to feed, but instead their actions are based on pure instinct. After some deep thinking on existential zombie issues, I came to the conclusion that really, it’s all just an excuse to show the effects of the "mob mentality" by way of the undead tearing someone apart.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Edited Dinosaur Attacks
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Dinosaur Attacks

      January 27, 2010, 5:58 pm
      Every little kid goes through a dinosaur phase, and I was no exception. In fact, when Jurassic Park came out on VHS I bought that over a gameboy (I was 8 years old). In any case, meeting prehistoric creatures always gets movie crowds going, even from the very beginning of film (the first animation that could be considered a movie was Gertie the dinosaur in 1914). Special effects have come a long way since 1914 (or even 1925 when The Lost World featured stop motion dinosaur action), and consequently have brought them back from a kind of extinction. Even if only to make humans a thing of the past...

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 Edited Hangover Scenes in a Feature
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Hangover Scenes in a Feature

      January 13, 2010, 5:52 pm
      <strong>Wow.</strong> New Years, as usual, was quite a party. Unfortunately, some people ended up partying too hard, and woke up not feeling too hot the next morning. Whoops. Well, it seems fitting to showcase some exceptionally bad hangovers (from not only New Years but all other types of parties as well) as a follow up from last episode, so here we go.

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting

    • Top 5 (Edited) Most Awkward New Year’s Eve Patie
      EDITING

      Top 5 (Edited) Most Awkward New Year’s Eve Patie

      December 30, 2009, 12:32 pm
      New Year’s is the time to make resolutions, change your ways, and cleanse your spirit for the better. Unfortunately, everybody’s definition of "better" is different, and I’ve taken the time to outline a few examples here. The commonality is that each character decides to execute these resolutions at a New Year’s party— and what’s New Year’s without a party?

      • Report
      • Share
      • Save

      Share this posting





    SUBMIT A LINK

    Newest From Aotg.com
    Stay Informed
    • Mail List

      E-Mail Newsletter

      Choose what Post News gets sent directly to your E-Mail, daily or weekly.

    • Apple iOS Mobile App

      AOTG App for iOS

      Get your post news on your favourite Apple device, when you want it where you want it.

    • Android Mobile App

      AOTG App for Android Devices

      Get your post news on your favourite Android device with the AOTG Android App.