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  • News! A video essay on constructive editing

    News! A video essay on constructive editing

    November 12, 2012, 10:04 am
    DB here: In connection with our textbook, Film Art: An Introduction, we’ve created several videos examining film techniques. Thanks to Peter Becker and Kim Hendricksen of Criterion Classics and Janus Films, we’ve been able to include clips from film classics, from Ashes and Diamonds to Ugetsu Monogatari. Because our publisher McGraw-Hill sponsored the production of...

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  • Other Postings By Member

    • How LA LA LAND is made
      EDITING

      How LA LA LAND is made

      January 23, 2017, 8:06 am
      La La Land (2016). The formal method is fundamentally simple. It’s the return to craft (masterstvo). Viktor Shkovsky, 1923 DB here: Not how it was made. We’ll get “The Making of La La Land” as a DVD bonus, and there are already behind-the-scenes promos. No, this is about how it is made. On this site, […]

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    • Friendly books, books by friends
      EDITING

      Friendly books, books by friends

      December 11, 2016, 9:39 am
      Moses and Aaron (1974). DB here: When the stack of books by friends threatens to topple off my filing cabinet, I know it’s time to flag them for you. I can’t claim to have read every word in them, but (a) we know the authors are trustworthy and scintillating; (b) what I’ve read, I like; (c) […]

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    • ARRIVAL: When is Now?
      EDITING

      ARRIVAL: When is Now?

      November 24, 2016, 7:15 am
      Arrival (2016). DB here: A lot of today’s movie storytelling is nonlinear. Filmmakers rely on flashbacks, replays, and voice-overs in order to shape our experience, sometimes in fairly daring ways. In Hollywood these strategies got consolidated in the 1940s. Or so I argue in my Reinventing Hollywood, now in copy-editing (or as the University of Chicago Press calls it, […]

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    • Eep, omigosh, urk, smerp, and other Archie epithet
      ANIMATION

      Eep, omigosh, urk, smerp, and other Archie epithet

      October 22, 2016, 3:15 pm
      DB here: Not all cinephiles are comics fans, but quite a few are. I guess it’s partly a matter of the Adolescent Window, and partly an intuition that both are forms of what Will Eisner calls “sequential art.” For my part, a Boomer childhood spent with Nancy and Little Lulu and Scrooge McDuck was followed […]

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    • Replay it again, Clint: Sully and the simulations
      VFX

      Replay it again, Clint: Sully and the simulations

      September 25, 2016, 7:40 pm
      Sully (2016). What happens in the Forties doesn’t stay in the Forties. That’s one motto of the book I’ve just finished on Hollywood storytelling in the period 1939-1952. The argument is that several narrative conventions that crystallized in that era became part of the Hollywood tradition and continue to shape the films of today. I […]

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    • In pursuit of THE CHASE
      EDITING

      In pursuit of THE CHASE

      August 28, 2016, 3:58 pm
      The Chase (1946). DB here: While writing my book on Forties Hollywood, I often felt that every movie I talked about was based either on a bestseller, a Broadway play, or something by Cornell Woolrich. Many of the best, or at least strangest, films of the era come from his haunted imagination. The Chase (1946), […]

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    • Open secrets of classical storytelling: Narrative
      EDITING

      Open secrets of classical storytelling: Narrative

      January 11, 2016, 5:40 am
      Premium Rush (David Koepp, 2012). DB here: After nine years, over 700 entries, and many essays and other stuff, this contraption of a website has started to intimidate us. If we’re intimated, you might be flabbergasted. Although a set of categories sits on the right to guide your exploration of this tangled databank, those too loom large […]

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    • Sometimes a reframing…
      EDITING

      Sometimes a reframing…

      September 1, 2015, 11:15 am
      Side Street (1949). DB here: …just knocks you out. “It can only be fully recommended to those who have a deep and morbid interest in crime.” Snooty judgments like this made Bosley Crowther the critical joke of generations. Today film lovers wear their deep and morbid interest in crime as a badge of honor. Especially […]

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    • TRUFFAUT/HITCHCOCK, HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT, and the Bi
      EDITING

      TRUFFAUT/HITCHCOCK, HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT, and the Bi

      June 12, 2015, 1:12 pm
      Photo by Philippe Halsman. I’m going through a Hitchcockian period; every week I go and see again two or three of those films of his that have been reissued; there’s no doubt at all, he’s the greatest, the most complete, the most illuminating, the most beautiful, the most powerful, the most experimental and the luckiest; […]

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    • The waning thrills of CGI
      VFX

      The waning thrills of CGI

      May 24, 2015, 9:03 am
      Kristin here: There have been rumblings lately about the surfeit of CGI-heavy films, especially superhero movies, and about a certain monotony in the results. Critics and fans are hailing Mad Max: Fury Road, in no little part because George Miller did stage much of the action, with real fantasy vehicles and hair-raising stunts, and employed […]

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