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  • Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run

    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run

    December 1, 2010, 12:26 pm
    Comedy is one of the hardest genres to cut, because it is, many times, up to the editor to sell the joke. Fortunately, there are a few actors that are true comedians in the sense that it is obviously natural to them, making the movie fun to work with. I can only imagine that the late Leslie Neilsen was one of those actors. The deadpan way in which he delivered his lines was so flawless that few actors have been able to match him.

    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run feature)

    In memoriam.
    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run
    5. Forbidden Planet (1956) Id at the Door

    Though Neilsen was known for his comedy more than his dramatic roles, Forbidden Planet is worth a mention in his career, especially in regards to editing. An unseen monster attacks the characters, and timing plays a huge role in keeping the viewers tense and interested in what’s going on. Near the end, the monster tries to break through the door, and a psychological battle with the professor is instigated. Here, the pacing is appropriately dramatic and the attention paid to shapes in each shot helps to move the eye smoothly.
    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run
    4. Airplane (1980) "I just wanted you to know; good luck, we’re all counting on you."

    Airplane is probably one of my favourite movies of all time— and one reason for it is how the editor manages to seamlessly fit in random jokes next to each other and not lose the flow of the film or the story. One joke that turns into a motif simply by placement and good timing, is Neilsen opening the door to the cockpit multiple times and reiterating the fact that everyone is counting on the main characters. No pressure.
    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run
    3. Spy Hard (1996) Protect the Limo

    Here’s a great scene that illustrates how a tense situation can be hilarious and still have tension to propel the story. Sounds: Pop, pop, pop. Extreme close up of Neilsen, to make us both laugh and feel slightly uncomfortable. Pop, pop, pop. Random parade audience member popping bubble wrap. Pop, pop. Back to extreme close up of Neilsen. Pop. Two shot of hot chicks in bikinis popping bubble gum bubbles.
    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run
    2. The Naked Gun (1988) Student Driver Car Chase

    This scene is funny, exciting, and explosive (literally). The pacing is great, managing to keep the energy high while not sacrificing the jokes. In fact, the gags feel natural and not as obvious as the usually might be, making the scene that much funnier.
    Top 5 Scenes Involving Leslie Neilsen (Theatre-run
    1. The Naked Gun 2 ? (1991) The Blue Note

    This scene has a couple elements to it, but I’m mostly referring to the conversation between Neilsen and Presley when I’m explaining its editing brilliance. For a simple dinner table conversation, it is the editor’s cutting pace and take choice that ultimately will make the scene successful and funny. The pacing here is impeccable, not holding so long on a reaction that it hits the viewer over the head, but instead almost makes the viewer do a double take— making the scene even funnier than just showing what’s being said or done.

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  • Other Postings By Member
    • The Top 5 American Western Standoffs
      EDITING

      The Top 5 American Western Standoffs

      August 5, 2009, 12:24 pm
      To kick off the first post for the Edit Decision List, I thought it would be fitting to choose a topic that relies on one of the most fundamental techniques in editing film: building tension. There are many places for using this technique, but it is in its most blatant use in the Western Standoff. Therefore here is The Top 5 American Western Standoffs based on editing.

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    • Top 5 Edited Live Action Movie With Talking Animal
      EDITING

      Top 5 Edited Live Action Movie With Talking Animal

      July 17, 2009, 12:32 pm
      I just recently finished compositing some shots for a live-action Disney DVD film (soon to come) involving talking animals. This is the first time that I’ve really done anything like that, and although I wasn’t editing, I could appreciate how difficult it can be to edit a film with animal actors as I saw the shots come in. And it’s difficult regardless of if they have moving mouths or not. Animals aren’t really "acting" on their free will as humans do, so discerning which take is the best has to with a mixture of the action being performed properly (pun intended) as well as juxtaposing the action with another action to convey an accurate sense of emotion, which 95% of animals (arguably) don’t naturally exhibit.

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